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  • Conservative osteoarthritis therapy programme delays need for knee and hip joint replacement surgery

    With implementation of conservative treatment methods like physiotherapy and individually tailored, adjusted exercises, quality of osteoarthritis care can improve and patients can delay the need for an artificial hip or knee joint.

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  • What You Should Know About Torn Bicep Tendon Injuries

    A biceps tendon injury is a tear or rupture of connective tissue that connects the biceps muscle of the upper arm to bones at either the shoulder (proximal tendon) or elbow (distal tendon). Proximal tears are more common than distal tears and usually are the the result of chronic overuse or an acute injury, such as a direct blow to the shoulder or falling onto an outstretched arm.1

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  • What Jobs Are Toughest On The Knees?

    Based on a review of 71 studies that included nearly one million workers, the riskiest occupations include agriculture, construction, mining, service jobs and housekeeping. And jobs that demand excessive kneeling, squatting, standing, lifting and climbing stairs all increase your odds.

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  • In Many Cases, Hip Replacement Also Eases Back Pain

    If you have a bad hip and lower back pain, a new study suggests that hip replacement surgery may solve both issues at once.

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  • Physical Therapy For A Pectoralis Major Tear

    A torn or ruptured pectoralis muscle can limit your ability to engage in normal work and recreational activities. It can limit arm use, and may cause significant pain. If you have ruptured or torn your pectoralis major muscle in your chest, you may benefit from physical therapy (PT) to help you recover.

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  • Does Medicare Cover Hip Replacement?

    Medicare typically covers hip replacement surgery, providing a doctor confirms the procedure is medically necessary.

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  • Sports Injury Prevention Using the 10 Percent Rule

    Once you know you can safely exercise the main thing to remember is that you need to progress slowly. The 10 percent rule is a guideline many fitness experts use to help both experts and beginners avoid injury, yet they still see continual improvement in performance.

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  • 7 Ways to Test for Tennis Elbow at Home and in Office

    Tennis elbow, or lateral epicondylitis, develops when the forearm muscles that connect to the outside of your elbow become irritated. This can cause pain and tenderness that’s usually located on the outside (lateral) part of the elbow. There are several simple tests you can do to determine if you have tennis elbow. You can do most of these tests on your own, but a few do require the assistance of a doctor or medical professional.

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  • Vitamin D boosts chances of walking after hip fracture

    Senior citizens who are not vitamin D deficient have a better chance of walking after hip fracture surgery. The findings suggest that vitamin D deficiency could limit mobility in older adults, according to one of the researchers.

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  • For older people and those with chronic health conditions, staying active at home is extra important

    While we don't know for sure how long our lifestyles will be affected in this way, we do know periods of reduced physical activity can affect our health. Older people and those with chronic conditions are particularly at risk.

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